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Minnesota Workers’ Compensation Statistics [2020]

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Posted By KSK Law | March 28 2022 | Workers' Comp

Injuries on the job are more common than you may think. Fortunately, Minnesota requires employers to provide their employees with workers’ compensation insurance. Workers’ comp is in place to protect employees who sustain an injury or illness on the job by providing them with compensation to cover their medical bills and lost wages. Because these injuries must be reported in order to receive insurance coverage, the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry has this data available.

For this study, we analyzed injury data from three industries: healthcare, construction, and manufacturingWe also compared Minnesota to national workplace injury data from the BLS.

Table of Contents

Minnesota Healthcare Injuries & Illnesses (2020)

According to OSHA, hospitals are actually the most hazardous place to work in America. Nationally, nursing assistants reported the highest number of occupational injuries out of any other occupation in 2020. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that health care and social assistance workers had a 40% increase in total injuries and illnesses from 2019 to 2020. Let’s examine how that looked among Minnesota health care workers.

Nonfatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses by Healthcare Job (Minnesota, 2020)

healthcare worker injuries 2020

Employees at nursing and residential care facilities reported the most injuries of any health care job, with 42% of the total cases. Hospital employees had the second highest number of reports with 32%.

Breakdown of Nonfatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses by Healthcare Job (Minnesota, 2020)

HEALTHCARE JOB TOTAL RECORDABLE CASES
Ambulatory health care services 4,800
Offices of physicians 2,000
Outpatient care centers 500
Home health care services 900
Hospitals 8,300
General medical and surgical hospitals 8,300
Nursing and residential care facilities 10,600
Nursing care facilities (skilled nursing facilities) 5,800
Residential intellectual and developmental disability, mental health,
and substance abuse facilities
1,900
Continuing care retirement communities and assisted living facilities for the elderly 2,700
Social assistance 1,700
Individual and family services 1,200
Child day care services 200

Note: Numbers are rounded and may not always add up to total.

Which Injuries or Illnesses Were Reported?

While the data did not specify all of the exact injuries and illnesses, here is what we do know.

  • 10,600 cases involved respiratory conditions
  • 200 cases involved skin diseases or disorders
  • 500 cases were reported as “other”

 

Minnesota Healthcare Fatalities

There was only 1 reported fatality from the healthcare industry in 2020. The reason for the fatality was reported as a “transportation incident.” This is defined as any fatal occupational injury involving a roadway, nonroadway, air, water, or rail, including being struck by a vehicle.

How Does Minnesota Compare Nationally?

  • The total number of healthcare injury & illness reports in 2020 in Minnesota was 25,400.
  • The total number of healthcare injury & illness reports in 2020 in the U.S. was 806,200.
  • This means that Minnesota accounted for 3.15% of national healthcare injuries in 2020.

 

Learn more about workers’ compensation for healthcare workers.

Minnesota Manufacturing Employee Injuries & Illnesses (2020)

manufacturing injuries 2020

Among manufacturing industries, food manufacturing was the one with the most nonfatal injury reports in 2020 with 2,200. This trend was reflected nationally, too; in 2020 the most manufacturing injuries in the U.S. happened in food manufacturing, with 82,000 reports.

Which Injuries or Illnesses Were Reported?

Unfortunately not every case in the dataset specified the injury or illness, but here is what was reported.

  • 700 cases involved respiratory conditions
  • 400 cases involved hearing loss
  • 300 cases were reported as “other”

 

Minnesota Manufacturing Fatalities

  • There were 7 reported fatalities in the manufacturing industry in Minnesota in 2020.
  • The cause of all 7 fatalities was not specified, however there were 2 fatalities reported as “transportation incidents” and 3 reported as “falls, slips, trips.”
  • The specific manufacturing industries with fatalities were food manufacturing (4 deaths) and nonmetallic mineral product manufacturing (1 death). The remaining fatalities and the causes of these were not specified. At least 1 food manufacturing fatality was from animal slaughtering and processing.

 

How Does Minnesota Compare Nationally?

  • The total number of manufacturing injury & illness reports in 2020 in Minnesota was 10,900.
  • The total number of manufacturing injury & illness reports in 2020 in the U.S. was 373,300.
  • This means that Minnesota accounted for 2.92% of national manufacturing injuries in 2020.

 

Learn more about workers’ compensation for industrial workers and factory workers.

Minnesota Construction Worker Injuries & Illnesses (2020)

construction injuries 2020

The dataset did not contain enough information to specify which injuries and illnesses were sustained in the construction industry.

Breakdown of Nonfatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses by Construction Job (Minnesota, 2020)

CONSTRUCTION JOB TOTAL RECORDABLE CASES
Construction of buildings 1,100
Nonresidential building construction 400
Commercial and institutional building construction 300
Heavy and civil engineering construction 500
Highway, street, and bridge construction 200
Specialty trade contractors 3,000
Foundation, structure, and building exterior contractors 500
Building equipment contractors (plumbing, electrical, HVAC) 1,400
   Electrical contractors and other wiring installation contractors 600
   Plumbing, heating, and air-conditioning contractors 700
Building finishing contractors 700
Other specialty trade contractors 500

Note: Numbers are rounded and may not always add up to total.

Minnesota Construction Worker Fatalities (2020)

  • 15 fatalities were reported from the construction industry in 2020.
  • 6 of these were from transportation incidents, and 5 were due to falls, slips, or trips. The other causes of death were not specified.
  • The 5 deaths from falls, slips, or trips occurred among specialty trade contractors.
  • There was 1 reported death from the heavy and civil engineering construction industry. The cause was not specified.

 

How Does Minnesota Compare Nationally?

  • The total number of construction injury & illness reports in 2020 in Minnesota was 4,700.
  • The total number of construction injury & illness reports in 2020 in the U.S. was 174,100.
  • This means that Minnesota accounted for 2.7% of national construction injuries in 2020.

 

Learn more about workers’ compensation for construction workers.

How Does Minnesota Compare to Other States?

Minnesota was the 10th highest state for total number of workers’ comp cases in 2020.

Number of Recordable Workers’ Comp Cases (2020)

RANK STATE TOTAL RECORDABLE CASES
1 California 355,200
2 Texas 178,600
3 New York 129,000
4 Pennsylvania 122,700
5 Illinois 106,900
6 Michigan 88,800
7 Ohio 85,300
8 Washington 78,200
9 New Jersey 75,800
10 Minnesota 66,900
11 North Carolina 64,900
12 Indiana 64,300
13 Wisconsin 59,900
14 Arizona 59,800
15 Massachusetts 58,800
16 Tennessee 57,500
17 Missouri 53,600
18 Virginia 52,600
19 Oregon 43,400
20 Maryland 42,400
21 Kentucky 40,000
22 Iowa 34,000
23 Alabama 33,800
24 Connecticut 33,300
25 Nevada 29,800
26 Oklahoma 29,100
27 South Carolina 29,100
28 Kansas 26,800
29 Utah 26,300
30 Arkansas 25,100
31 Louisiana 22,900
32 Nebraska 19,300
33 Maine 16,700
34 New Mexico 13,200
35 West Virginia 12,900
36 Hawaii 10,900
37 Montana 10,200
38 Vermont 6,900
39 Alaska 6,700
40 Delaware 6,700
41 Wyoming 5,000
42 District of Columbia 4,800

 

Minnesota had 66,900 reported workers’ compensation cases in 2020. Data was not available from Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Mississippi, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, or South Dakota.

Tips for Preventing Workplace Injuries

Although these three industries come with occupational hazards, there are plenty of steps that can be taken to reduce and prevent injuries at work.

  • Always wear protective gear (PPE) when necessary such as gloves, eyewear, or a hardhat
  • Never rush when using dangerous tools
  • Follow protocol when climbing up or down ladders
  • Stay hydrated and take breaks when working in hot environments
  • Ensure proper ventilation
  • Know where to find a first aid kit

 

If you do get injured at work in Minnesota, make sure to report it as soon as possible to your employer and the Department of Labor. Then contact an experienced workers’ compensation attorney.

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